Siwicki

The Future of Movies

September 05, 2016

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Growing up, there were only two rooms in the house that had air conditioning. We would all fall into those rooms on days when it was too hot. I always remember that feeling of walking from the cool, air conditioned room, opening the door to get out, and hitting that wall of moisture and heat.

The summer is always a time that my mind associates with the movies. Overtime, my once weekly ritual has become, “we can wait till Netflix.”

Things started to changed last winter when “The Force Awakens” reminded me of the joys of going to the movies and how much fun it can be to surrender your complete attention to something else for two hours.

Theaters

Theaters have become an escape for me, but I don’t go to the movies to see a particular movie anymore. Normally, there are about two movies a year that I am generally excited to go see. But lately, I have been liking to go to the theater more often.

The movie theater is one of the last places where it is socially unacceptable to look at your phone. While I was having my moment of Zen in the movie theatre, I was looking around and there was very few people. This was a film that you would expect more people to show up to during the prime time showing.  

VR the Answer

Lately, I have been thinking about ways to detox from my life with technology. It has become all too much for me to take in. Naturally, VR has been something that has been mentioned for movies and to be installed in theaters.

There is something that is gross about sharing a VR headset with a stranger, but I wanted to think about what movies I would want to watch in VR and would not make me sick for two hours. There were a lot of questions that I wanted to ask.

Video on Demand

Lately, I have been purchasing/renting a lot of content from Amazon and Vimeo. I feel like these distribution channels allow me to consume a lot more interesting content that ever before. If you don’t live near an indie movie house, some films are hard to come by. But, services like Vimeo allow creators to get their film out to audiences. I would love to know the split and how Vimeo compares to iTunes.

The rise of niche streaming services has been interesting. I subscribe to a few of them to get even more diverse information into the picture.  

It forced me to open myself up to a new content age, new rules of film, and not just watching whatever.  

What’s Next?

How many people watch a movie at home with their phone next to them? I know that sometimes when I am watching a move the phone gets looked out way too much. I think that takes away from the movie. My attention is getting broken up. It is different, I think, with a TV show than it is with a movie. We are trained to have commercial breaks. That is what I love most about the theater and that is what keeps me going regularly.


John SiwickiWritten by John Siwicki who lives and works building interesting things. You should follow him on Twitter