Siwicki

Website Teardown – Trump vs. Hillary

May 12, 2016

Screenshot 2016-05-12 22.14.53

Screenshot 2016-05-12 22.15.14

For some reason, I started down a rabbit hole. That is a journey that yields interesting results. So I decided to run both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton’s websites through some of the normal tests that I go through for the projects I work on.

We ran a few page speed tests as well as a full audit. I wanted to look under the hood to see if there was anything interesting or if there was some interesting technology being used.

A few quick notes before we get started. Hilary’s website weighed in at 1.4MB and 64 requests. Trumps website weighed in at 1.1MB and 92 requests.

Google Pagespeed

Hillary

Desktop: 60 Mobile: 57

Hillary’s website had a few things that should be fixed that could increase her score a ton. A leverage browser caching and optimizing a few images would boost the score on both desktop and mobile by huge numbers.

Trump

Desktop: 87 Mobile: 70

Trump’s big difference is his handling of images so far in the page speed report. I think that is one of the main differences between Donald and Hillary.

Pingdom Website Speed Test

The Pingdom test provides a little more of a breakdown of what is going on with the website. I get to see a sample speed as they allow you test it from different locations as well as give you a nice read out of all the different types of files and each file being requested.

Trump

Load Time: 1.70 sec., 23 Images and 10 Scripts

Trump’s site seems to be really lean and well put together. The website feels like it uses WordPress, but there is nothing that screams that. 1.70 sec. is a nice load time for such a heavy website. The image count is low and most of the page wait is coming from the number of scripts.

Hillary

Load Time: 2.14 sec., 17 Images and 16 Scripts

Going along with the Google Pagespeed scores, Hillary’s load time is a little on the longer side. It seems to be the six extra scripts and the lack of the image optimization that is it slowing down

Wrap Up

The Clinton web team gets a special mention for having a message in both the console and at the top of the document. There is also a link to the job posting page and a small little nod to anyone who is looking at the code. Furthermore, Clinton’s website uses typography as its main component to get its message across. Finally, the main typeface on Clinton’s site is called Unity, a customization of Sharp Sans by Lucas Sharp. I really love this.

In comparison, Trump’s site is led strictly by Trump imagery in the hero spot with Montserrat font controlling the type.


John SiwickiWritten by John Siwicki who lives and works building interesting things. You should follow him on Twitter